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    Norbert Moslang + Andy Guhl – Sound Shifting

    August 1st, 2009

    Norbert Moslang + Andy Guhl – Sound Shifting

    Voice Crack was a Swiss noise duo consisting of musicians Andy Guhl and Norbert Möslang. They formed in 1972 as a free jazz outfit, but abandoned that format in the early ’80s to experiment with what they called “cracked everyday electronics,” which consisted of small, cracked open appliances rigged up with amps. This set-up produced sounds that could turn on a dime from a sparse clatter to an all-out noise tsunami.

    The Sound Shifting book documents a sound art installation constructed by Norbert and Andy at the 49th Venice Biennal in 2001. It’s composed of a lengthy series of full-page bleed, closely-cropped blurry abstractions captured by a digital camera. Although one would never know just by looking, the subject of the photos highlights all of the hustle and bustle of traffic on the Canale Grande, one of the many busy waterways of Venice, Italy. Likewise, the CD is filled with nearly an hour’s worth of skittering, reverberated drones and occasional noise outbursts captured by an underwater microphone at the same location.

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    Voice Crack – Kick That Habit

    April 28th, 2009

    Voice Crack - Kick That Habit

    Voice Crack was a Swiss noise duo consisting of musicians Andy Guhl and Norbert Möslang. They formed in 1972 as a free jazz outfit, but abandoned that format in the early ’80s to experiment with what they called “cracked everyday electronics,” which consisted of small, cracked open appliances rigged up with amps. This set-up produced sounds that could turn on a dime from a sparse clatter to an all-out noise tsunami. Although Kick That Habit hails from the 1980s, it looks like it could have been filmed decades earlier in some grey Eastern bloc country, what with its blurry, bleak backdrops and stark, grainy atmosphere.

    The movie, which contains no talking or singing, jumps back and forth between snowy outdoor scenes in the Alps, indoor live performances, random objects like electric fans and dripping faucets, and people trudging around out in public. We join the members of Voice Crack during a game of putt-putt golf. The clanking of the golf balls against the resonant metal contraptions on the course is striking. Then comes an abrupt cut to a roomful of their cracked everyday electronics–complete with the vivid image of transistor radios squealing on twirling turntables–that form an impenetrable sonic stew.

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