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    Sir Richard Bishop + Sir Robert Millis at the Whistle Stop

    June 19th, 2018

    Sir Robert Millis performs at the Whistle Stop in San Diego, California on April 25, 2015.
    Sir Robert Millis performs at the Whistle Stop in San Diego, California on April 25, 2015.

    San Diego, California
    April 25, 2015

    Sir Richard Bishop is a seller of rare books and guitar player who is best known as a member of the Sun City Girls, a one-of-a-kind band that was busy churning out Top 10 hits (at least in a few peoples’ households) from 1981-2007. Sir Robert Millis is a writer, videographer and musician who is part of an experimental outfit called the Climax Golden Twins. (According to the invisible friend inside my mind, their name is a tribute to the Climax Blues Band, Golden Earring and the Thompson Twins.) Both Rick and Rob are also world travelers who have contributed to the Sublime Frequencies label of raw international music.

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    Sublime Frequencies at the Silent Movie Theatre

    May 16th, 2018

    Sublime Frequences at the Silent Movie Theatre in Los Angeles, California on August 6, 2013.
    Sublime Frequences at the Silent Movie Theatre in Los Angeles, California on August 6, 2013.

    Los Angeles, California
    August 6, 2013

    Sublime Frequencies is a collective of explorers dedicated to acquiring and exposing obscure sights and sounds from modern and traditional urban and rural frontiers via film and video, field recordings, radio and short wave transmissions, international folk and pop music, sound anomalies, and other forms of human and natural expression not documented sufficiently through all channels of academic research, the modern recording industry, media, or corporate foundations. Sublime Frequencies is focused on an aesthetic of extra-geography and soulful experience inspired by music and culture, world travel, research, and the pioneering recording labels of the past including Ocora, Smithsonian Folkways, Ethnic Folkways, Lyrichord, Nonesuch Explorer, Musicaphone, Baronreiter, Unesco, Playasound, Musical Atlas, Chant Du Monde, B.A.M., Tangent and Topic.”

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    Remembering Randy “Biscuit” Turner 1949-2005

    April 1st, 2018

    Randy Biscuit Turner at home in Austin Texas, circa 2004. Photo by Rich Jacobs.
    Randy Biscuit Turner at home in Austin Texas, circa 2004. Photo ©2004 by Rich Jacobs.

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    Letter From Conrad Conrad – March 19, 1997

    March 19th, 2018

    Letter From Conrad Conrad - March 19, 1997.
    Enlarge

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    To Rococo Rot at Kim’s Underground

    February 4th, 2018

    To Rococo Rot at Kim's Underground in New York, New York in 1998. Photo ©1998 by Pat D.
    To Rococo Rot at Kim’s Underground in New York, New York in 1998. Photo ©1998 by Pat D. Photo enlarges.

    Kim’s Underground
    New York, New York
    1998

    “To Rococo Rot were a Berlin-based trio who combined electronic and analog elements to create instrumental post-rock and electronic music. Pitchfork described the band’s sound as “unmistakably digital, yet 100% human.” The group was composed of bassist Stefan Schneider and brothers Robert Lippok (electronics, guitar) and Ronald Lippok (drums, effects). The band’s name is a palindrome, as it can be spelled the same both forward and backward. To Rococo Rot formed in 1995 and were active until 2014, releasing eight major albums and numerous collaborations, remixes, singles and EPs. They were known for their minimalist, musically engaging live show, and gave their final performance on December 17, 2014 via a live-streamed ‘In Stereo’ session in the Boiler Room.”–Wikipedia

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    Charles Gayle Trio at Olé Madrid

    January 1st, 2018

    Charles Gayle Trio at Olé Madrid in San Diego, California on Tuesday, February 27, 1996.
    Charles Gayle Trio at Olé Madrid in San Diego, California on Tuesday, February 27, 1996. Photo ©1996 by Rich Jacobs. Photo enlarges.

    Olé Madrid
    San Diego, California
    Tuesday, February 27, 1996.

    “Charles Gayle is a free jazz spaceship engine that has been igniting New York launching pads like the Knitting Factory for the last decade or two. This evening involved two long sets of ’60s-inspired free clamor divided by a half-hour break. The stand up bassist and drummer each soloed up their fair share of intense improv freedom as Gayle offered up anti-abortion / pro love / pro-Jesus sentiments punctuated by scratching sawmill violin; crude, ominous Casio keyboard chords; and cascading waterfalls that shoot up into the Sun via some really intense sax note / sheet wailing. It was a spontaneous sound aquarium that simultaneously stapled me to my chair and hurled me through distant expanses of beautiful uncertainty. It’s safe to say this performance was pure lift-off that took me a little bit further than out on a limb.”–GSD, Lou’s and the Abstract Truth (Lou’s Records newsletter), February 1996

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    Iannis Xenakis – Le Diatope Program

    December 1st, 2017

    Iannis Xenakis, Le Diatope program.
    The cover of Iannis Xenakis’ Le Diatope program, circa late 1970s.

    Here we have a few visual treats from a program published on the occasion of avant-garde Greek composer Iannis Xenakis’ Le Diatope, a spectacle of architecture, light and sound to celebrate the opening of The Pompou Center in Paris in 1978. “Made of red vinyl stretched over a metal frame, the Diatope’s curvilinear form recalls the famous Philips Pavilion designed by Xenakis and Le Corbusier for the Brussels World Fair in 1958, which housed the Poème Electronique of Edgard Varèse. Indeed, the immersive multimedia plan of the Philips Pavilion was the model for a number of later works Xenakis called Polytopes. He created four of these prior to the Diatope: the Polytope de Montreal in 1967, an open-air spectacle in Persepolis in 1971, and two Polytopes in the Parisian Abby of Cluny in 1972 and 1973. Inside the Diatope, Xenakis arranged a light show involving 1600 flashbulbs and four lasers guided by four hundred adjustable mirrors. Both abstract and representational figures were meticulously choreographed and traced by light. Xenakis’ sketches for the light show mention shapes such as lotuses, galaxies and wheels.”–Socks Studio

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    The Record Truck LA

    November 1st, 2017

    The Record Truck in Los Angeles, California on February 25, 2017.

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    Is This the Isthmus? Tour – Mexico Part 25

    October 22nd, 2017

    Sunday, October 22, 2017
    Mexico City, Mexico

    The Tlatelolco archaeological excavation site on the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in in Mexico City, Mexico.
    The Tlatelolco archaeological excavation site on the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in in Mexico City, Mexico.

    Sunday, October 22 was my last day in Mexico, as well as the final day of the Is This the Isthmus? Tour, so I had to make it count. At 8:30 am, I boarded a shuttle van with several other tourists from Europe, New Zealand and Peru, bound for the ancient city of Teotihuacán, about an hour north of Mexico City. On the way there, we briefly stopped at a couple of different places. The first was Tlatelolco, “an archaeological excavation site in Mexico City, Mexico where remains of the pre-Columbian city-state of the same name have been found. It is centered on the Plaza de las Tres Culturas.

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    Is This the Isthmus? Tour – Mexico Part 24

    October 21st, 2017

    Saturday, October 21, 2017
    Mexico City, Mexico

    An Aztec dancer poses with a fan at the Zocalo in Mexico City, Mexico.
    An Aztec dancer poses with a fan at the Zocalo in Mexico City, Mexico.

    I heard there was supposed to be some kind of event and / or parade at the Zócalo today, so I walked down there and looked around for a while, but never did see anything. Instead, I shot photos of the Aztec dancers at the Zocalo, which I had been meaning to do for the past few days anyway. Since it was Saturday, more people than usual showed up to watch the various groups of dancers who were plying their trade around the plaza.

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